How to Encourage Chanterelles in Woodland

by Mike
(Canterbury, UK)

Hi,

I stumbled onto your site and love the ideas here. I'll probably be experimenting with some mushroom cultivation in our new woodland this year.

We have to fell some mixed chestnut and oak so will have plenty of logs to work with.

I was wondering if you knew of anyway to encourage chanterelles to establish themselves? We have no shortage of hardwood trees (oak, beech, chestnut and birch) but I've yet to see any edible mushrooms here.

Would you be able to bury some spawn around the surface roots? Can you even get chanterelle spawn?

Many thanks

Mike

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Chanterelles Cantharellus Seeds Marketed on Ebay NEW
by: Chuck Ripplinger

10,000+ SEEDS SPORES are being listed For Sale thru a Seller in Serbia.

My experience in Germany related that Chanterelles / "Pfifferlinge" grew exclusively in Fir Forests ( Black Forest ).

The product description is as follows:

Chanterelles Cantharellus cibarius MUSHROOM
[ 10,000+ "SEEDS" ]

The picture accompanying the listing seems to show hermetically sealed plastic bags with "seedling Chanterelles".

Am I about to be subject to a hoax?

Chanterelles Cantharellus Seeds Marketed on Ebay NEW
by: Anonymous

10,000+ SEEDS SPORES are being listed For Sale thru a Seller in Serbia.

My experience in Germany related that Chanterelles / "Pfifferlinge" grew exclusively in Fir Forests ( Black Forest ).

The product description is as follows:

Chanterelles Cantharellus cibarius MUSHROOM
[ 10,000+ "SEEDS" ]

The picture accompanying the listing seems to show hermetically sealed plastic bags with "seedling Chanterelles".

Am I about to be subject to a hoax?

Chanterelle farming NEW
by: klaypigeon

There has been some initial success with propagating chanterelles by introducing the mycorrhizal relationship to saplings. I remember seeing a study that was being done in Oregon, but there is precious little info.

Get your diy-scientist hat on and start some experiments! http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Flavorful-Fungus-Farmed-For-1st-Time-in-Oregon-2857440.php

so beautiful
by: Jane Perinacci

This is such a beautiful shot! In my mind it looks like nature's horn section in a band!

Cultivating Chanterelle Mushrooms
by: Amy

Hi Mike,

Thanks for visiting and I'm glad you like the site. You're asking some great questions, and unfortunately the answers aren't so cut and dry.

Chanterelles are mycorrhizal, meaning they form a beneficial, symbiotic relationship with the roots of certain trees. The fungus gets the benefit of sugars that the tree produces, and the tree gets the benefit of being able to absorb extra water and nutrients through its new fungal "fingers". The mushroom mycelium essentially extends the reach of the tree's roots.

The problem becomes, how do you simulate such a thing in the wild? The relationship between most mycorrhizal fungi and trees is very complex and not fully understood by modern science. Even if you were able to cultivate some spawn, getting it to produce a fruitbody is another matter.

(There's also the theory of fungi secession, the idea that certain species have to appear before the conditions are right for your desired species to appear. This is mentioned a lot when talking about matsutake. Now how to you recreate THAT in nature?)

Does this mean you should give up all hope of encouraging chanterelle growth? I don't necessarily think so. Your idea of burying spawn near the right trees has been echoed by many, only with chanterelles you'd use stem butts or spores instead of spawn. You can always try the spore slurry method on the growing morels page:

http://www.mushroom-appreciation.com/growing-morel-mushrooms.html

It's unreliable and could take years to establish, but what have you got to lose? Chanterelles aren't really successfully grown indoors (thus no spawn for sale anywhere) but there's still so much we don't know. If you found a way to grow chanterelles, you'd be crazy rich.

So good luck with your projects! For more growing information, I'd recommend any of the books by Paul Stamets.

Thanks,
Amy

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